Sunday, July 30, 2017

The Roth–Steyr M1907, or, more accurately Roth-Krnka M.7 was the first self-loading pistol to be adopted by a major power.


The pistol was designed for and issued to the Austro-Hungarian cavalry during World War I.
It was developed by the Czech designer Karel Krnka, working for an ammunition company of Georg Roth, from an earlier design of Roth–Theodorovic pistol. After development and tests of several prototypes, the final version of the Roth–Krnka won the trials for an Army pistol in 1906, and was adapted as a standard gun of Austro-Hungarian Army designated, Repetierpistole M.7. (self-loading pistol M1907).



Since Roth had no weapon production capabilities, the government bought all the rights and contracted with Hungarian arms makers Steyr and FEG in Budapest.


The pistol is a locked-breech pistol, which allows the barrel and bolt to recoil together within a hollow receiver. The long bolt is solid at the rear, except for the striker grove, the front part is hollow and fits tightly over the barrel. The interior of the bolt has cam grooves cut into it, and the barrel has cam lugs which fit into the bolt grooves. When the pistol is fired, the barrel and bolt recoil together within the hollow receiver for about 0.5 inch. During this operation, the helical grooves in the muzzle bushing cause the barrel to turn 90 degrees clockwise, unlocking the bolt as it continues to the rear, cocking the action as it does so.The empty case is extracted and ejected. The bolt is now at the rear position and the recoil spring is compressed. Under the action of the recoil spring, the bolt closes and a new cartridge is pushed in the barrel, the bolt is locked and the pistol ready to fire.

The pistol was claimed to embody important advantages as a cavalry weapon, ease of ambidextrous operation and particularly in the isolation of the trigger system from the auto-loading action to reduce the possibility of accidental firing.

Chambered for the 8mm Roth-Steyr cartridge specific, to this model. The pistol does not have a detachable magazine, but features a fixed magazine loaded from the top with stripper clips.




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Wednesday, July 26, 2017

The Deluxe Grade Remington Model No.3 Hepburn Long Range target rifle.


Lewis L. Hepburn was from Colton, NY, where he had a small shop and was specializing in making percussion match rifles. Around 1874 he went to work for Remington as their top barrel maker and designer. In 1873-74 the Irish shooting team challenged the US to an International Long Range rifle match. The US won that match, however Lewis Hepburn noted the deficiencies in the Remington Rolling Block rifles used during those matches and set out to redesigned a completely new action for target shooting. In 1879 he was granted a patent for his dropping block action and Remington Arms, would developed and produced the Hepburn rifle starting in 1879. The Hepburn dropping block action was so simple and strong that only minor changes were needed to take it from the black powder period into the high-power smokeless era.

All Hepburn rifles were manufactured in limited numbers with the deluxe, Long Range target rifles such as this one being manufactured in extremely limited numbers as they were intended strictly for the Long Range military matches.
This rifle is chambered for the 44-100 Remington Hepburn Creedmoor cartridge.


As you can see the sights are a front globe target sight with a spirit level; a military style tangent rear sight along with a Long Range, Vernier peep sight, with a locking eye-cup aperture, mounted on the upper tang.




This rifle, likely a special order item, is entirely nickel finished including the cleaning rod and butt plate.


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Sunday, July 23, 2017

Prototype Czechoslovakian Model S Semi-Automatic Rifle ca 1929.




In the late 1920s when the Czechoslovakian military was actively developing several new semi-automatic rifle designs. This is a prototype of what they came up with, the Model S semi-automatic rifle.

This rifle was way ahead of its time as it has a gas operated system that uses a long operating rod mounted on the underside of the barrel, similar to the M1 rifle. The rear of the operating rod is connected to the bolt, so that when each shot is fired it cycles the bolt and cocks the action. To initially load or charge the rifle it uses a fixed cocking handle on the right side of the action, that pulls the bolt to the rear and then disengages (from the bolt) and is pushed forward. To release the bolt you pull the trigger, which allows the bolt to go forward and strips a new cartridge from the detachable box magazine. It also uses a very unique "two-piece" hinged receiver type design. Chambered for the 7.92mm Mauser cartridge.

In looking closely at this rifle you can clearly see that this rifle could have very easily been the forerunner of the famous FN 49 and FN/FAL rifle designs as it has numerous similarities compared to those two rifles as follows: a hinged/split upper and lower receiver, a side mounted cocking handle that disengages from the bolt after it is cocked, a gas operated system that utilizes a long-stroke operating rod that directly cycles the bolt. Even when you look down into the trigger group, (hammer, sear and disconnect mechanism) you can clearly see the similarities to the FN49 and or FN/FAL trigger mechanism.

Now you say so what! Well you have to remember this was made in the 1929 time frame almost 10 years before the US M1 garand, the Russian SVT 38 and German G41 and 20 years before the FN rifles!






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Wednesday, July 19, 2017

The Iron Frame Henry, New Haven Arms Company manufactured approximately 275 iron frame Henry rifles concurrently with the brass frame rifles in 1861 and 1862.


The iron frame models had a case-hardened iron receiver, hammer, loading lever and buttplate.



Production of all Henry rifles ended in 1866 with approximately 14,000 units having been manufactured.

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Sunday, July 16, 2017

This is a Simson & Company prototype semi-automatic pistol that was was developed circa 1928/29 in the hopes of developing a physically larger arm than the 9mm Luger semi-automatic pistol.


During the Weimar era 1920-1930, Simson & Co. was the only manufacturer permitted to repair, rebuild or even manufacture new pistols for both the military and police units in Germany, in accordance with the Treaty of Versailles to prevent any future German re-armament.


Obviously this pistol was developed as a potential rival to the German Luger and with Simson’s close ties to the German Government they anticipated securing military contracts with a newly designed pistol.
However, with the rise of Hitler and the National socialist state with their anti-Semitic ideas, forever doomed Simson & Co. and their newly designed pistol from ever entering production.
It is estimated that probably not more than 10-15 were actually manufactured before they stopped all efforts.

 


It is an extremely well made pistol with all machined steel parts. You can see how the overall design was influenced by the standard German Luger, as it has the same grip angle as a Luger, with very similar shaped checkered walnut grip and it uses a slightly modified German Luger magazine. All these features would have made training and conversion to this design much easier. 


It has very few markings, the left side is hand engraved, "Simson u. Co. Suhl/Waffenfabriken" and directly behind that is a large rotating safety lever. When it is engaged and pushed down it exposes the hand inscribed word "Sicher" indicating "SAFE". In the inside, front area of the trigger guard loop to a small serrated takedown lever.
Currently there are only a handful of these ultra rare prototype pistols known in the world today.


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Thursday, July 13, 2017

Like the blog title says "They Make All Kinds", a George J. Tibert 12-Shot Revolving Rifle.


 Produced in 2006, this rifle combines features from a number of classic weapons with new design ideas to create a weapon that will chamber modern ammunition while still maintaining an "antique" style and appearance. 


At the core of the weapon is a sidehammer single action revolver system, not unlike the Colt Root series, fitted with a "conical" 12-round cylinder, narrower at the front, which further emphasizes the unique overall form. A raised block front sight without bead is present on the half-round, half-octagon barrel. Smooth forearm, with a concealed ejector assembly on the underside. Extra-fancy walnut buttstock, with a brass hand rest on the wrist, raised and contoured right-handed cheekpiece, brass buttplate and raised scroll carving on the right side.







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Sunday, July 9, 2017

"Texas Jack 1896"


This outstanding Colt, manufactured in 1895, has been engraved in the rich American style of Master Engraver L.D. Nimschke. The revolver has been restored and engraved, by an unknown engraver at a much later date. The backstrap is inscribed "Texas Jack 1896". From that date one must assume it was meant to represent, John Vermillion, a friend of the Earps. Was the artist trying to produce a counterfeit piece, which is doubtful, or maybe a conversation piece. Regardless of the who, what or where, it is an outstanding work of art.










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Wednesday, July 5, 2017

This revolver was designed and patented by Jacob Rupertus of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.


Rupertus was a gunsmith working for John Krider, a manufacturer and importer in Philadelphia. 
The design was patented by Rupertus on April 19, 1859. 
It is though that Rupertus made three model prototypes. "Army" size, "Navy," and "Pocket", with no more than a dozen were manufactured in all three sizes, and only half that number are known to collectors. (The Army model is pictured.)
At one point, Krider and and a man named John Siner showed interest in backing development of Rupertus' design. However they soon realized it would cost a large sum to build and to manufacture the revolvers themselves and foresaw the end of the percussion system due to metallic cartridges.
Colt also expressed interest in aspects of the design, but Rupertus was not interested in licensing or selling his patent. 



The Rupertus revolver design is unusual in that it utilizes only one nipple for ignition instead of one for each chamber. The nipple is mounted on an arm in a recess in the breech. This is a "safety tube" in the patent. The arm retracts when the hammer is cocked to allow the cylinder to rotate as it is pushed by the pawl at the bottom of the hammer. When the hammer is near full cock the arm snaps forward locking the cylinder and creating a gas seal. The hammer is pill primed by a mechanism within the back strap. 







The loading lever rotates to the right rather than down and loads from the side rather than through the front. The barrel and frame are manufactured as one piece creating a very stable firearm. 


                            


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Sunday, July 2, 2017

The 1890's saw the beginning the semi-automatic pistol era. Designers from the four corners of the world were feverishly producing the unique to the weird.



A prime example is this Model 1895 Krnka Prototype pistol as developed by Karel Krnka. 
Karel was a very talented engineer born in 1858 in Bohemia, (today upper Czechoslovakia) that was credited with the development of one of the forerunners of the more successful Roth–Steyr M1907, or, more accurately Roth-Krnka M.7 semi-automatic pistol. Krnka was credited with several innovative pistol patents during his lifetime.


This pistol was probably developed/produced for the Austro-Hungarian test conducted in 1897/98, but probably never used. There were only a handful of these early pistols produced at best, with almost no examples surviving in the world today.

This pistol has a very unique mechanism that has a locked breech with an actual "rotating/turn bolt" mechanism with Krnka’s unique extractor mechanism. It is also fitted with an early hold-open device based on the use of the magazine follower, with a side mounted bolt release, operating in the same manner as many of the current day semi-automatic rifle and pistols. It also has an internal magazine and is loaded via a magazine stripper through the top of the action.

It is cocked/loaded by pushing the barrel rearward, inserting a loaded stripper, pushing the rounds into the internal magazine and withdrawing the stripper, allowing the bolt to go forward and ready to fire. One of the most interesting and unique features of this pistol is that it actually can fire in a double action manner and has a rebounding hammer. This rebounding mechanism works when you fire the pistol and the trigger is released the hammer automatically rebounds to the half-cock position. It is fires a 8mm pistol cartridge, and holds approximately 10 rounds.


                            



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