Monday, August 29, 2016

Winchester Patent Model for M-1876 Pocket Revolver




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In 1875/1876 Winchester was again planning to make a splash in the revolver market and planned on doing so at the Centennial Celebration in Philadelphia in 1876.
“Winchester invested a great deal of money and time in the "Centennial model 76" revolvers". This pistol designed by Hugo Borchardt and S.W. Wood is the patent model revolver for one of the Winchester “Centennial” revolver series.

It is the only patent model known and one of only a handful of 1876 series Winchester revolvers in private hands.

It is the only 32 caliber manufactured.
It is the only pocket model manufactured.
It is the only spur trigger manufactured.
It was the only fully functional swing-out cylinder manufactured at the time.

"The three major designs developed in the Wood and Borchardt revolvers;
1. A double action mechanism,
2. Fixed thumb and cylinder extractor,
3. Swing-out cylinder and simultaneous extractor and was the first and only successful swing-out cylinder design of its time.”


   Winchester-1876-Centennial-Revolver.jpg

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Thursday, August 25, 2016

Warner "Infallible Pistol"



Warner Arms Corp. of New York City, NY was a firearms dealer and importer who sold to the commercial market. World War One interrupted their importing of the German made pocket pistols which were big sellers for Warner. To offset this Warner purchased the patents of Andrew Fyrberg and went about having the "Infallible Pistol" produced, in 32 ACP, by various sub-contractors around Norwich, CT. 

The guns were called the "Davis-Warner Infallible", and their trademark was "Blocks the Sear", a reference to the way the safety worked. Frame is unusual in that it is color case hardened. It had a thumb safety on the left side with magazine release in the left heel and it is fitted with checkered hard rubber grips having an intertwined “WAC” logo at the top.
However, the pistol had one serious drawback. At the back of the gun was a small dis-assembly lever with a push through pin. If the shooter disassembled the pistol and forgot the turn that lever the right way, or forgot to push the pin all the way in, the breechblock would be stopped only by a small projection and could come back into the shooters face. 
The guns were not "infallible" and the company soon went out of business.



Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Prototype Browning Lever Action























This Browning designed prototype lever action centerfire rifle has front and rear locking lugs, a design reminiscent of no other Winchester rifle of the late 19th century.


Winchester's partnership with John Browning began in 1883 and lasted 16 years. Browning's legacy at Winchester is marked by the company's most notable late 19th century firearms such as the Model 1885 single shot rifle, Model 1887 lever action shotgun, Model 1897 slide action shotgun and lever action Models 1886, 1892, 1894 and 1895.

Speaking to Browning's success, firearms historian and author R.L. Wilson stated, "No other gun inventor or designer can rival John Browning's string of achievements. He owned 128 gun patents covering eighty different firearms; he sold approximately forty gun designs to Winchester."

Of course, not every Browning patent Winchester purchased made it to the factory production line. The trail leading to even the most successful designs is often steeped in documented and undocumented trials and errors.

This 30 caliber Browning prototype carbine is fitted with a pinned blade front sight and a ladder rear sight marked "1873" and graduated from 2-9. There are no external markings on the rifle. The upper tang is drilled and tapped. The rifle was left in the white. Mounted with a smooth forearm and straight grip stock. There is a single barrel band and a carbine buttplate. The receiver has an exposed hammer and a bolt, which slides back when the action is opened. When closing the action the bolt slides forward to lock. A true one of a kind prototype showcasing Browning's partnership with Winchester.

The action is similar to that found in Browning's patent 492459. Patent 492459 is for a .30 caliber lever action rifle, which was applied for on March 22, 1892, and issued on February 28, 1893. Browning had several lever action rifle patents purchased by Winchester and patent 492459 is one of those patents but was not used in a production Winchester firearm. In fact, Winchester purchased many Browning patents that were not used in production firearms.
























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Saturday, August 20, 2016

Mohawk Manufacturing Co. Pocket Revolver




Here is one you don't see every day, a factory engraved Mohawk Manufacturing Company Pocket Revolver. The company was founded by a consortium of local businessmen in Mohawk, New York. The company was in business from 1870 to 1878 and only a few hundred of these pocket revolvers were made before the company dissolved in 1878.  
The top of the barrel rib is marked "MOHAWK MFG CO. MOHAWK, N.Y".  
As you can see the revolver is a spur trigger, 5 shot 32 rimfire closely resembling the Smith & Wesson Model 1 1/2 2nd Issue, except with a solid frame. It features a unique spring loaded cylinder pin mounted between the barrel and ejector stud. The spring is mounted inside the ejector housing which automatically returns the pin. 




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Tuesday, August 9, 2016

.22 caliber First Generation Colt SA Army







This is an example of a rare .22 caliber First Generation Single Action Army, one of 90 that were originally manufactured as .44 rimfire revolvers but were converted to .22 caliber before leaving the factory in 1888.  Many of these revolvers were subsequently altered or destroyed. This example is listed in the "Colt Peacemaker Encyclopedia Volume 2" as having been shipped to Kittredge on July 21, 1888, along with two other .22 rimfire revolvers. At first glance the revolver looks to be a standard .45 caliber revolver until the bore and hammer are looked at more closely. It is marked with "22 CAL" on the left front trigger guard shoulder over the original "44 CAL".




Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Prototype Remington New Model Army








This prototype Remington New Model Army revolver was formerly part of the famous Locke and "Slim" Kohler collections. They list the revolver as manufactured in 1869 or 1870. The revolver has no visible markings. 

It is primarily built like a standard New Model Army but differs significantly in the way the cylinder is secured. Instead of a winged pin that enters through the front of the frame, it has as cross pin and sliding latch. The cross pin is pushed inwards towards the left. Then, the latch is pulled towards the muzzle releasing the cylinder, so that it can be removed from the left side. 





The design is based on Samuel Remington's March 17th, 1863, patent. It is recorded as Patent No. 37,921 for "Improved Method of Holding the Base-Pins of Revolving Pistols" and was designed to rectify issues with the cylinder pin system used on the Model 1861 revolvers at the behest of the Ordnance Department, but the firm opted to revert to the older system used on the Beal's revolvers. 
The main advantage of this system is that the loading lever can be operated without worry of the cylinder pin falling out. Losing a cylinder pin during the heat of combat would render the revolver effectively useless. Not to mention creating a mess in your shorts.

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