Thursday, May 25, 2017

A prototype Japanese semi-automatic rifle that was manufactured by the Koishikawa (Tokyo) Arsenal for the Japanese Army Test Trials held in 1935.





An exceptionally rare copy of the John Pedersen rifle. There were approximately 24 of these Pedersen designed longarms manufactured in total: 12 with the longer (26.5 inch) barrel, such as this one, and 12 with the shorter carbine length (22.5 inch) barrels.

In the late 1920’s, John Pedersen started working with the U.S. Ordnance Department on his “toggle-bolt” design semi-automatic rifle. His design was rejected and 1932, after teaming up with the Vickers Company in England to produce the "toggle-bolt" mechanism, John Pedersen traveled to Japan to demonstrate his rifle in the hopes of gaining foreign sales.
General Yoshida, who was in charge of manufacturing at the Tokyo Arsenal, was impressed with the Pedersen rifle design and chose to copy it. He redesigned the mechanism to fire the 6.5 mm Japanese cartridge, and instead of the original 10 round magazine, he designed a rotary magazine that held five rounds. 
Yoshida’s design was submitted for Japanese Army Test Trials held in 1935, but all testing was halted when Japan invaded mainland China in July 1936/37. 




Interesting to note that the rifle appears to have an integral scope base machined in the receiver.









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Sunday, May 21, 2017

The Smith & Wesson First Model 44 Double Action revolver was introduced in 1886 and sold until 1912. This factory engraved revolver sold in 1907 at a retail price of $13.75 plus the engraving charge.










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Saturday, May 13, 2017

Colt Third Model Dragoon manufactured in 1858, nickel plated and with "New York" retailer style floral scroll and geometric engraving.











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Wednesday, May 10, 2017

The Colt Monitor Automatic Machine Rifle


In 1931, the Colt Arms Co. introduced the Colt Monitor Automatic Machine Rifle (R 80), intended primarily for use by prison guards and law enforcement agencies. Intended for use as a shoulder-fired automatic rifle, the Colt Monitor omitted the standard bipod, instead featuring a separate pistol grip and buttstock attached to a lightweight receiver, along with a shortened 458 mm (18.0 in) barrel fitted with a 4-inch (100 mm) Cutts compensator. Weighing 16 lb. 3 oz. (7.34 kg) empty, the Colt Monitor had a rate of fire of approximately 500 rpm. 


Around 125 Colt Monitor automatic machine rifles were produced; 90 of these were purchased by the FBI. Eleven rifles went to the U.S. Treasury Department in 1934, while the rest went to various state prisons, banks, security companies, and accredited police departments. Although the Colt Monitor was available for export sale, no examples appear to have been exported to other countries.

The FBI purchased approximately 90 Monitors and put them on display in a series of propaganda films depicting Mr. Hoover overseeing some of his agents firing (with tracer) at cars. The Monitor did its job well and soon the cars were chopped to pieces by the armor piercing .30-06. This was Mr. Hoover’s weapon of mass destruction as it put his men on equal footing with the likes of Bonnie and Clyde. The Monitor was the first official “Fighting Rifle” of the FBI. 

In the capture and shooting of Bonnie and Clyde, along with a multitude of weapons, BAR’s and one Monitor were used. The Barrow’s gang had two BAR’s, dozens of Colt 1911s, and a variety of other lethal weapons. Captain Frank Hamer of the Texas Rangers had the Monitor (serial number C-103168) that was allegedly presented to him by the Colt Company. The gang never had a chance to use their weapons because they were “cut down” before they could react.



The text and leading picture for this post are from Paul Reynolds FB page. See his page at; 
https://www.facebook.com/PhotoColourisation/?rc=p 
The leading picture was originally black & white and was cleaned up & colourised by Paul. Check out Paul's page for some great colourized WW2 pictures.



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Sunday, May 7, 2017

This rifle was one of the early competitors of the 1922 era test/prototype rifles that were considered as semi-automatic service rifle of the U.S. Government. These test trials were held by the U.S. Army starting in 1921 that ended in 1922/23.



It is the Model 1923 Auto-Rifle as designed by the Auto-Ordnance Company and manufactured by Colt Firearms Company. The Colt Firearms Company and the Auto-Ordnance Company had a working relationship in the development and manufacturing of the 1921 Thompson Submachine Guns. So this rifle was an outgrowth of that partnership.

               
It appears to actually be a bolt action design with a very long action and corresponding bolt body with a short bolt handle on the right side. When you lift the bolt handle it follows a large slot in the top of the receiver that cams the rear of the bolt to unlock the two rows of six opposing locking lugs found on the rear of the bolt body. It has a heavy tension coil spring concealed inside the bolt body which drives the bolt forward into the locked position. It looks like a combination of several period rifles; the front half is patterned after the 1903 Springfield with a pistol grip stock. It has a long one-piece trigger guard/floor plate similar to the 1917 pattern rifle with a unique two-piece receiver/action, joined in the center of the receiver.
It holds 5-6 rounds of 30-06 ammunition in a conventional box magazine, again similar to the 1903/1917 rifles.





             



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Wednesday, May 3, 2017

The blunderbuss was made in numerous styles and this one is certainly of a different sort. Unfortunately, I could not find more detailed pictures of this one.



This unique gun has a barrel tapers from the breech end forward, five sided to eleven sided to round with flared muzzle which measures 1 5/8". As you can see it is a percussion with a two piece cylinder shaped device with a hinged rear portion mounted on the lock which holds a proprietary percussion pellet cap which fits into the center. The head of the hammer has a shield protruding to the outside and the hammer is a rimfire style. The lower portion of the original spring was left and provides the tension for the hinged portion of the device. The only markings on the gun are two Birmingham proof marks. 








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Monday, May 1, 2017

The Frank Wesson #2 Rifle


Exact manufacture dates for the Frank Wesson #2 rifle have been lost to time, but experts believe that Wesson manufactured these under lever falling block rifles from the early or mid-1870s through the 1880s with total production of the No. 2 standing at less than 100. (Others have suggested that Wesson manufactured less than 75 No. 2s. A very rare single action rifle.)









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