Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Savage M-1899-D Military Musket















It's believed that the entire Savage production of this arm was shipped to Canada during World War I to arm the Montreal Home Guard.


The rifles in "musket" form incorporated a bayonet lug and military style stock with a handguard. 
They were chambered in the 303 Savage cartridge so as not to delay delivery which would have resulted if the design was altered for the standard Canadian 303 British Mk II cartridge. 

The Guardsmen were responsible for purchasing their own rifles and had the option of having their names stamped on the stock. Many also chose to have their names engraved on the left side of the receiver (not the case with this rifle).  

Blade front sight and folding leaf rear sight graduated to 1,300 yards. The front barrel band is fitted with a bayonet lug. Blue finish with casehardened lever and mounted with a smooth full length walnut forearm with grasping grooves, matching hand guard, sling swivel on the rear barrel band and a straight grip perch belly stock with a steel carbine buttplate and sling swivel. The buttplate tang is marked with the rack number "328".
This particular rifle is stamped "F.A. STEVENSON" and "MHG/1914" on top of the stock.







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Sunday, November 27, 2016

Mershon and Hollingsworth Self-Cocking Revolver



This is a patent model of the Mershon and Hollingsworth revolver. The patentees were Ralph S. Mershon and Jehu Hollingsworth of Zanesville, Ohio and patent number 39,825 for a self-cocking mechanism was granted Sept. 8, 1863.
The patent model was essentially a modified Colt Army Model 1860 revolver. The designers argued that standard single-action revolvers like the Colt 1860 and even double-action revolvers like the Beaumont Adams revolver, when in field combat conditions, required too much effort to cock and fire.



This was submitted to the US Army without success. It was turned down stating what little benefit the design had to offer in lighter, faster trigger pull, it has lost in added cost of manufacture and complicated functionality.




It used a wind-up spring to power a ratchet inside the hammer. A fold-out handle on the left side of the revolver’s frame (shown above) facilitated winding the spring. With the spring wound the device worked as follows: When the trigger was pulled, the hammer fell, struck a percussion cap and set off the round. As this happened a lug at the rear of the trigger slipped into the device and kept it motionless. When the trigger was allowed to reset, the lug slid out of the device, allowing its spring to rotate an internal wheel which moved the hammer back to full-cock and at the same time, unlocked, rotated and re-locked the cylinder.


This is from their patent application.

“To pull the trigger [on the Self-Cocking Revolver] requires no greater effort than in any arm cocked by hand, nor does the trigger require any longer sweep.  Hence it admits of an accurate aim, not subject to be defeated or disturbed by a violent muscular exertion in pulling the trigger.  In this very important particular consists its great superiority over all other self-cocking arms, all of them requiring so much muscular effort in pulling the trigger as to wholly defeat or disturb the aim and object of an arm, except at very close quarters.”
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Thursday, November 24, 2016

Roth-Sauer M-1900 Pistol





















The late 1890's saw the beginning the semi-automatic pistol era. Designers from the four corners of the world feverishly producing the unique to the weird. It was an engrossing period for the gun nut.
Here is a perfect example, a little semi-automatic pistol that was designed in the late 1890's and very much ahead of its day. 

The joint work of famous gunsmiths virtually always ends with only a positive result especially when both gunsmith differ in imagination, experience, and some of them practiced in the design of ammunition. The Roth Sauer M-1900 pistol was designed by Karel Krnka, financed by Georg Roth, and manufactured by J.P. Sauer & Sohn in Germany.

It uses a stripper clip-loaded internal magazine in the grip and is chambered for the 7.65x17mm Roth-Sauer cartridge.
Also note that the outer form of the gun has no protruding parts which would make the gun fairly flat and comfortable to wear.


The pistol is mechanically quite complex – much more so than strictly necessary. The action is a long-recoil type, in which the bolt and barrel remain locked together through the full rearward travel of the bolt. The bolt then stays to the rear while the barrel recoils forward, clears the empty case, and ejects it. Once the barrel is fully forward, the bolt is released to strip a new cartridge from the magazine and chamber it.

The bolt has a single locking lug, which rotates into a recess in the barrel extension to lock. The firing mechanism is very similar to the later and modern style pistols such as the Glock and others. It uses a striker to fire, which is tensioned to half-cock by the bolt and barrel recoiling with each shot. Full tension on the striker is delivered by the trigger pull, resulting in a approximation of a double-action system.


Now if all this nuts bolts stuff is a bit confusing the following Forgotten Weapons video does a fantastic job on this little pistol and well worth watching.





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Sunday, November 20, 2016

Model 1853 Sharps Shotgun









This is likely the only high grade 24 bore Sharps Model 1853 shotgun ever manufactured. Sharps expert Frank Sellers only recorded two total 24 bore Model 1853's in his book "Sharps Firearms" and listed only one of those as "Fine Engraved." He notes that at least a few high grade guns are listed incorrectly in the factory records as plain. This is a late example and would certainly fall within the "Extra Fine Engraved" category and has the exact same gold inlaid barrel address and scrollwork pictured on page 59 of his book where he notes that this inlay is found "on the highest grade of Model 1853" shotguns. The scroll patterns covers the 9 inches of the breech section of the barrel, and "Sharps Rifle Manufg Co. Hartford, Conn." is at the center in Gothic script. The barrel also has one thin and one broad band of gold inlay at the muzzle and is equipped with a post front sight with small bead. Another very similar gun is pictured on page 46 of William Hosley's "Colt: The Making of an American Legend." Note that this shotgun and the pictured example both have the same pewter forend cap as well. The action, buttplate, and lever display beautiful engraving patterns consisting primarily of floral scrollwork on nearly all of the visible surfaces. 




















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Saturday, November 19, 2016

Japanese Hamada Military Pistols


This is a rarely seen WW2 Japanese military pistol. It is a Type I Hamada pistol that is somewhat of a copy of the original Browning Model 1910 pistol, only using a larger capacity magazine. The Hamada family were one of Japan’s first manufacturers of modern firearms with their gun shop founded in Tokyo in 1895.
The Type I were manufactured circa 1941-44, this one has a Showa date of "18" (1943) stamped on the frame. Even though there were an estimated 5,000 made in total, they are somewhat rare in that all of the pistols were issued to units being sent to China during the early part of WWII. The few surviving examples were captured in the Pacific Theater from officers or units that were transferred there before the end of the war.

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This is a Japanese Type 2 "Hamada" pistol. It was a continuation of the earlier Type 1 Hamada pistol. These Type 2 pistols were actually only produced from late 1944 until the fall of Japan in late 1945. It was designed and developed as a low cost substitute for the Type 94 Nambu pistol. They are a simple blowback design with the recoil spring around the outside of the barrel and housed inside the upper slide. 8mm Nambu chambered.



In a unique partnering arrangement, the Type 2 pistols were manufactured by the Notobe factory using tooling provided by Nagoya Arsenal and then shipped "in the white" to Nagoya's Toriimatsu factory where they would be inspected, blued, and issued to the various Japanese military units. The original production contract was intended for 500 guns.

However, collectors feel only 10 guns of the original 500 production pistols actually exist today. C.F. Author of Military Pistols of Japan, Fred Honeycutt Jr. identifies the highest known serial number of a Hamada, pg 124, Hanada type II as 50, this very pistol.
It is speculated that most assembled pistols were saved as souvenirs by various GIs and the remaining original unfinished pieces destroyed after the war.

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Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Bergmann M-1896 Pistols











The late 1890's saw the beginning the semi-automatic pistol era. Designers from the four corners of the world feverishly producing the unique to the weird. It was an engrossing period for the gun nut.

The Bergmann M-1896 was a 19th-century semi-automatic pistol developed by German designer Louis Schmeisser and sold by Theodor Bergmann's company. Bergman was a pioneer in developing semi-automatic pistols in Europe in the late 1890s and early 1900s.

A contemporary of the Mauser C96 and Borchardt C-93 pistols, the Bergmann failed to achieve the same widespread success.
These M-1896 commercial pistols are seldom seen as very few were produced with even fewer examples brought back by GIs after WWII. 
The first pistol pictured is a rare late production No. 4 pistol. The No. 4 is chambered in 8 X 22 mm Bergmann caliber.

The M-1896 was manufactured right at the end of production as it is estimated that approximately 1000-1500 total were produced between 1897 and mid 1898 with most examples being in the 6.5 and very few examples manufactured in the scarce 8 X 22mm cartridge. 

The No. 4 has the integral 5 round magazine that sits in front of the trigger. A distinctive flat top bolt and top cover with a magazine side plate with two angled cuts on the right side. It is provided with a means of attaching a shoulder stock.





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Bergmann 1896 Target Pistol



Another very scarce early Bergmann is this target pistol with the long barrel, target sights and rare set trigger. Chambered in 5 mm Bergmann. Only a handful of this rare long-barreled target models were ever produced. 
Additionally this example is fitted with a rare set of fully adjustable target sights. The rear sight can be drift adjusted laterally and also the aperture can be adjusted for elevation. It is fitted with a semi-hooded target front sight that is also adjustable for windage that is fitted with a pin-head front sight blade.





















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1st Model Sharps







Christian Sharps was issued a patent for his design of a breech-loading rifle on September 12, 1848. It would become known as the Model 1849 Rifle (a.k.a. 1st Model Sharps). 
The rifle was manufactured by Albert S. Nippes of Mill Creek, Pennsylvania, for Christian Sharps in 1849.

It was a breech loader that used paper cartridges. The rifle features the distinctive brass circular disk automatic capping device on the right side of the breech. To operate, the hammer was set at half cock and the lever lowered which dropped the breech block. When the breech block, which also contained the nipple, was dropped the capping device would automatically cap the nipple, cartridge would be inserted, breech closed and you were ready to full cock and fire.

Very few Sharps Model 1849 Rifles were manufactured; estimates of total production range from 50-150 rifles.

The top of the barrel is roll-stamped: "MANUFACTURED/BY/A.S. NIPPES/ PHILADA PA" in four lines behind the rear sight. "C.SHARPS/PATENT/1848" is stamped in three lines on the top of the breech.



1849sharps9.jpg



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